You are currently browsing the monthly archive for June 2009.

peppersHOW TO PLANT PEPPERS:

Peppers are a good choice for backyard gardeners, there are so many varieties you can grow that you can’t find in the supermarket.  There are a few tricks for growing peppers properly and getting the most out of your plants — so keep reading!

SOIL PREPARATION:

One of biggest keys to success in organic gardening is the condition of the soil.  There needs to be adequate organic matter to hold moisture and nutrients.  And at the same time, the soil needs to be loose enough for good aeration and drainage, which will help promote strong root development.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

WatermelonHOW TO PLANT WATERMELON:

No other fruit says summer quite like sweet, juicy, thirst-quenching watermelon. It’s not only refreshing on a summer day, it is also packed with vitamin C, vitamin A, beta-carotene, and vitamin B, as well as some of the most powerful antioxidants in nature. Watermelon can take up precious space in the garden, but it’s worth it. My mouth is watering just thinking about it!

SOIL PREPARATION:

One of biggest keys to success in organic gardening is the condition of the soil. There needs to be adequate organic matter to hold moisture and nutrients. And at the same time, the soil needs to be loose enough for good aeration and drainage, which will help promote strong root development.

Read the rest of this entry »

tomatoes-01HOW TO GROW TOMATOES:

There is nothing in the world like home-grown tomatoes right off the vine. And once you’ve tried them, you’ll never want to go back to store-bought. Tomato plants are relatively easy to grow too, with just a few tricks.

SOIL PREPARATION:

One of biggest keys to success in organic gardening is the condition of the soil. There needs to be adequate organic matter to hold moisture and nutrients. And at the same time, the soil needs to be loose enough for good aeration and drainage, which will help promote strong root development.

Tomatoes are easy to grow if your soil has the proper nutrients. People always assume their soil is average, but unless you have a soil test it is just a guess. More often than not, it is necessary to amend the soil to achieve optimum pH balances, as well as the proper levels of nitrogen, phosphorus and potash. Testing your soil is ideal, and we recommend a soil test every two to three years to check your phosphorus and pH, as well as nitrate and potassium levels, to ensure the best crop possible. It is very important that your phosphorous to

Read the rest of this entry »

honeydewHOW TO GROW CANTALOUPE/HONEY DEW:

Cantaloupe and honey dew are easy to grow with a few tips. Don’t plant too soon — wait until all frost danger is over — and keep them moist at all times. It’s very important that you don’t let them dry out during the hot part of the summer.  Keeping them moist is the secret.  One other tip: don’t plant cantaloupe in the same bed as your cucumbers. If you plant them too close to your cucumbers, they might cross and starting taking on the same flavor. In fact, plant up wind in you can.

SOIL PREPARATION:

One of biggest keys to success in organic gardening is the condition of the soil.  There needs to be adequate organic matter to hold moisture and nutrients.  And at the same time, the soil needs to be loose enough for good aeration and drainage, which will help promote strong root development.

Read the rest of this entry »

Tomato growing season is here!

THE ART OF WATERING TOMATO PLANTS

There has been a lot of debate about how to water a tomato plant.  Too much and you’ll get fewer tomatoes, not enough and they will crack. The quality of the fruit is defiantly on the line. Here is a system I developed for beginners, which also works for old-timers like myself. First you need to understand the crop. It’s okay to let them dry out between watering when they’re young — to the point where they’re just about to wilt from lack of water. This will produce flower production. They think they’re dying and when they do get watered they go into full flower production. Their whole job is to produce seed for the next generation, so they think “Okay, this is it, the only water I’m going to get” and the kick it into gear. So, don’t over-water in the beginning.

When fruit starts to form you need to count how many days it takes for the plant to start to wilt. Lets say it’s 5 days. In that case, your watering schedule will be every 4 days. This will change with weather and outside temperatures, so adjust accordingly. This way they get just enough with out drying out completely when in fruit production. When fruiting, don’t let them dry out because this is why your tomatoes crack. They store water in their fruit for drought, and they will take this water if needed. The tomato shrinks, and then when you water they fill their storage container (tomato) and they burst.   There really is an art to watering tomatoes!

F25gardening2_t575 Thank you for visiting our new blog, Organic Gardening News And Info. We are Kim Wilhelm and Bryan Jones of www.sweetcornorganicnursery.com,and we are big proponents of gardening organically.  We are excited to post info, and build a dialogue on everything from current news and information related to gardening organically, gardening tips and how-tos, ideas and recipes for using your harvest, and more!